Visual art

Under the Surface

Under the Surface

Taking a closer look is not always nice, but insightful.

ou're not dead when you donate your organs.
Modern transplantation medicine is only one example of seven topics, some of which seem to be unimportant and some of which are subject to strict social restrictions so that they are not dragged to the surface.
Therefore we leave them there - under the surface.
Secrets, denouncements and enthusiasm were processed in many layers with unusual combinations of material.

Into the Book!

Into the Book!

The exhibition of the Hui world.

A photo documentation of the exhibition in the Museum for Westphalian Literature at the cultural heritage House Nottbeck in Oelde.
With much joy and passion the Hartmut und ich novels were brought into reality and shown in great detail.

On the BAB

On the BAB

No one believes that the ones actually exist and that the others are so many.

Photo series of people whose jobs annoy anyone who wants to get from A to B on a motorway.
Construction sites on the motorway always look deserted. But if you sneak up on them carefully against the wind you'll be able to capture the shy companions photographically.
Trucks, on the other hand, are omnipresent. Far more clearly than one might admit. They present themselves in rows and also sometimes crisscross at rest stops, rushing closely past small cars, darkening the sky and breaking up the ground. They are anything but shy.

Two hundred Secret Works

Two hundred Secret Works

No one will ever see them.

For they existed, they were hidden and are now rinsed smooth, rotten or disassembled into their natural components.
The performance art Fluxus has been around since the 1969s, but only meant the fluid transition between art and life. Here it is the fluid transition between art, nature, transience, time and perception.
The project Two hundred Secret Works is a very quiet Fluxus variant, if one needs a name.

Apperception

Apperception

Tiny excerpt from the Oevre.

Apperception means the concrete and conscious reception of the substance of an event, a perception or an idea. In psychology, the term used by Leibniz and Wundt is about the classification of an active perceived event into the context of consciousness. In philosophy, the term is additionally used by Kant for the general, especially reasonable possibilities of consciousness. Adorno and Benjamin also differentiate the conscious perception running alongside. Ultimately it's always about cognition, i.e. about the totality of all processes related to perception and recognition.
The pictures shown here were created exclusively through that conscious perception. Even though the subjects themselves were always emotionally charged, the pictures only show what can be grasped with the senses and reproduced visually. Like memories of consciously experienced events, these images are not always precise and never photorealistic, but the substance of events, perceptions and ideas is always clearly captured.

Artificial Artifacts

Artificial Artifacts

A little insight into the oevre.

Man-made objects are artifacts. To charge them artistically is called artificial. That's exactly where this chapter in visual art started: A wonderful human being, sadly long gone, once tipsyly awaited a simple but plausible definition of what can be defined as art. He considered untenable the answer that you can turn anything into art - not only intellectually defined, but also visually effective. And even with very few resources. He provocatively presented a McDonald's plastic straw with the words: "Well, then make art out of that."
In the course of time, the processed objects are not only exclusively man-made, but also sometimes originated by natural means. Artification as such eventually developed into representational, abstract and informative components of the image composition.

Reception noema

Reception noema

Thesis by Sylvia Witt (written in generic feminine).

There are three different ways of receiving an artistic work, the most important distinguishing factor being the closeness to the artist.
What the artist herself sees in it forms the first level. She is a personal black box, not visible to the outside world. Everything that artists themselves say about their work is already subject to censorship and is modified according to the aim and purpose of the statement. In no case is it consistent with the original feelings and thoughts during the planning and execution of the picture. The first level of the reception of art thus remains unique, individual and monadic.
What people who are very close to the artist think about the work is the second level. They interpret her own feelings and thoughts with regard to the artist as the person they know. But in turn they always know only a part of this person, his role on the everyday stage. Facets like "the sister", "the best friend", "the mother", "the stubborn one", "the longhaired one", "the gentle one" or "the one who likes to laugh a lot". On the second level, the interpretation is therefore primarily personal, even if a work, for example, may contain a clearly global political statement.
The third level is what all others receive when they see a work and, depending on their previous knowledge, take the statements of the artist, contemporary events or typical elements of a style or an epoch into account. This level is naturally the most widespread and most diverse, but unfortunately also the most distant from what the creator actually had in mind. Interpretations that have gone down in art history as "true" are merely images of their time and of the always imperfect knowledge that was then spread about the creator. They are winners in the evolution of interpretations that, such as viewing habits and theoretical paradigms, can certainly change again over the decades.
It's like in the parable "The Blind Men and the Elephant" - individual experiences lead to one's own conclusions, which can sometimes be completely different from the conclusions of others.

It's easy to denote convenient prejudices, simple explanatory models or the first thing that seems plausible to you as truth. Reality can only be approached through the effort to illuminate it from as many sides as possible. This also means being able to plausibly defend your own reception. She is as individual as the artist and her work. Instead of joining a possibly erroneous majority opinion, one can also allow oneself to defend one's own, well-founded reception to be seen as equal to others.
In a figurative sense, this attitude can be extended to all living creatures outside of art: Even if biology provides life in the collective or at least in social interaction, every single living being remains an individual that does not only exists through the perception of others. So every single living thing is valuable per se. It requires neither the approval nor the merger, even if both are possible and sometimes necessary.
The three level reception thus always encourages self-thinking and respect for the individual.

As a consequence, the "Secret Works" almost inevitably resulted.
Works that get by without further recipients and stand alone for themselves and the creator. Works, exclusively on the first level of the reception. Works that don't last and are not photographed, if possible. Without audience.
A spirit of freedom, which was surprisingly recently expressed by John Malkovich as artist Piers in the final scene of the movie Velvet Buzzsaw. Pensive, a man exhausted by the art business draws himself free by means of endless ornaments on the beach. Only for himself, and, on the meta-level of course for the audience of the film, so that there is indeed a picture of the secret work that the film character doesn't know about.